DINING DIARY | JUE LAN CLUB / by Brackett Bilodeau

Image courtesy of Oleg March for UrbanDaddy

Image courtesy of Oleg March for UrbanDaddy

Just like its new home, this dining club has quite the storied past. It starts with Chinese painter Ny Yide, who came to Shanghai in the 1930s with the intent to gather a group of like-minded artists, which ultimately became known as the Jue Lan Society. They met secretly in Paris to trade art outside of the Communist regime of their homeland. Fast forward to 2016:
New York City’s most infamous church is reborn once again following its heyday as a nightclub in the ‘80s and ‘90s, thanks to the 21st century reincarnation of the Jue Lan Club. The bi-level dining destination is beautifully curated, with the expansive main floor decked out in rich textures, large industrial chandeliers, and quirky art, with the upper floor serving as a private event space, all styled in homage to the club’s 1930s origins. Chef Oscar Toro (formerly of Del Posto and Buddakan fame) helms the kitchen, turning out Chinese cuisine at the intersection of traditional and inventive. The raw bar shines, especially given its plans to expand into the garden come spring...in the meantime, we’ll be cozied up on the green velvet banquettes with Chef’s bone marrow dumplings, tea smoked chicken, and drunken black bass drowned in “heaven-facing chilis.” Contact your Attaché for reservations and more menu picks.